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Research

Facts on Breast Cancer Among Latina/Hispanic Women
 

  1. The Hispanic population is the fastest growing major demographic in the United States, and Latina women are more likely to have lower participation rates in cancer screening and other prevention programs[1]
     
  2. In a nationally representative sample of Hispanics, those from Mexico, Central America, and South America were less likely to receive cancer screenings relative to other Hispanic subgroups [2]
     
  3. Latinas have higher breast cancer mortality than non-Latina white women due to lower screening rates and limitations in access to timely care due to socioeconomic factors [3]
     
  4. After diagnosis of cancer amongst Latina patients, systemic therapy is the single treatment modality with the greatest potential to reduce survival disparities [4]
     
  5. Latinas have been noted to have fewer consultations with medical oncologists, receive less aggressive chemotherapy regimens, be more likely to discontinue chemotherapy than whites, and be less likely to have endocrine therapy prescribed than white women [5]
     
  6. Latina immigrants who lack English skills are less likely to receive the care and medical information that they need, especially after entering the health care system and experiencing barriers that lead to miscommunication which limit their ability to make treatment decisions [6]
     
  7. Often times Latinas have low knowledge and self-efficacy in the context of cancer, and it leads them to have misconceptions or negative expectations regarding chemotherapy [7]
     
  8. The reduction of systemic barriers such as access to health care and transportation can facilitate early detection of breast cancer among Latinas [8]
     
  9. Embarrassment is often times a strong barrier for participants because they do not want to show their breasts in medical or intimate contexts [9]
     
  10. Most Latina women do not perceive doctors as trustworthy gatekeepers of health information [10]
     
  11. Latina women need to have confianza, simpatia, respeto, and personalismo with their health care providers in order to establish trust [11]
     
  12. Health disparities pertaining to breast cancer arise from the institutional, psychosocial, and cultural contexts in which Latinas are diagnosed [12]
     
  13. Latinas experience a 5-year survivorship rate of 76% due to being detected at a later stage, having treatment delays, and lower quality of care [13]
     
  14. A number of negative posttreatment effects, including fatigue, depression, and strained work and spousal relationships appear greater among Latina survivors compared to white women [14]
     
  15. Among Latina women, the word “cancer” is equated with death in their home countries [15]
     
  16. Some Latina women reported feelings of shame and secrecy related to their breast cancer and/or sexual functioning-feelings that at times extended to partners of patients, perhaps in part due to Latino machismo [16]

References

Buki, L. P., Garcés, D. M., Hinestrosa, M., Kogan, L., Carrillo, I. Y., & French, B. (2008). Latina breast cancer survivors' lived experiences: diagnosis, treatment, and beyond. Cultural diversity and ethnic minority psychology14(2), 163.

Haile, R. W., John, E. M., Levine, A. J., Cortessis, V. K., Unger, J. B., Gonzales, M., ... & Bernstein, J. L. (2012). A review of cancer in US Hispanic populations. Cancer Prevention Research5(2), 150-163.

Lopez-Class, Maria, et al. "Quality of life among immigrant Latina breast cancer survivors: realities of culture and enhancing cancer care." Journal of Cancer Education 26.4 (2011): 724-733.

Sheppard, Vanessa B., et al. "Latina a LatinaSM: developing a breast cancer decision support intervention." Psycho‐Oncology17.4 (2008): 383-391.


[2] Haile, R. W., John, E. M., Levine, A. J., Cortessis, V. K., Unger, J. B., Gonzales, M., ... & Bernstein, J. L. (2012). A review of cancer in US Hispanic populations. Cancer Prevention Research5(2), 150-163.

[3] Sheppard, Vanessa B., et al. "Latina a LatinaSM: developing a breast cancer decision support intervention." Psycho‐Oncology17.4 (2008): 383-391.

[4] IBID

[5] IBID

[6] IBID

[7] IBID

[8]Buki, L. P., Garcés, D. M., Hinestrosa, M., Kogan, L., Carrillo, I. Y., & French, B. (2008). Latina breast cancer survivors' lived experiences: diagnosis, treatment, and beyond. Cultural diversity and ethnic minority psychology14(2), 163.

[9] IBID

[10] IBID

[11] IBID

[12] IBID

[13] IBID

[14]Lopez-Class, Maria, et al. "Quality of life among immigrant Latina breast cancer survivors: realities of culture and enhancing cancer care." Journal of Cancer Education 26.4 (2011): 724-733.

[15] IBID

[16] IBID

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